2012 Friedman Grants

 

Photo of Adrienne BenallyAdrienne Benally

Doctoral Student in Cultural Studies

Award Amount: $500

Attend Rio+20 Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


With the support of the Friedman Grant, I attended the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) that takes place every spring at the UN headquarters in New York City. The 2012 UNPFII theme was: “The Doctrine of Discovery: it’s enduring impact on Indigenous Peoples and the right to redress for past conquests.” The scope of material covered in the Forum’s sessions and working groups spanned more than five centuries—examining the historical context of the Doctrine of Discovery in different parts of the world; the impacts of the Doctrine as an international legal construct on Indigenous Peoples; and, as the foundation for the violation of human rights. I was able to access an important venue to hear from world leaders and experts in many relevant fields related to my own research study, as well as hear directly from Indigenous Peoples from around world whose experiences and first voices are extremely valuable to my research inquiry. The UNPFII is a working session at the UN and I was fortunate to be able to participate in discussions of international politics and legal frameworks as they pertain to Indigenous Peoples.


Photo of Patricia Burns and Crystal ErlendsonPatricia Burns

Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art Student

and

Crystal Erlendson

Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art Student

Award Amount: $1,500

                                                                      Sculptural Monuments Dedicated to Women


The obstacles of power, politics, family obligations, and money are barriers that can cripple female artistic endeavors. It is critical that women continue to produce art and put it into the public realm to reshape and reinvent the image of our environment that has largely been designed by men. In receiving the Friedman Grant we created several pieces relating to feminism and building female presence by displaying them throughout CGU’s campus. For the first sculpture we created an arch monument dedicated to women artists. In researching monuments we found practically nothing that had been created for women and by women. In calling these arches “monuments” the monumentality of the object can be found in the idea and the idea will transcend the materials. The first piece was roughly ten feet high by four feet wide. The form resembled not only an arch-monument but also a heroic equestrian form. Our first sculpture’s initial showing was on the sculpture pad in the front of the CGU Art building for a week.

The second sculpture in this body of work was a contorted version of the arch monument. The piece was spray painted in reference to vandalism and institutional critique. While the sculpture was still large, it was not large enough to be an actual monument and it took on an anti-heroic form. The sculpture was positioned on different parts of the CGU campus. The sculpture lounged in front of the library like Titian’s Venus of Urbino, laid injured on the stairs of the Scripps theater like Eugene Delacroix’s paintings of the Napoleonic war and crawled on the stairs of the CGU Art building like Louise Bourgeois.


Photo of Thomas ConnellyThomas Connelly

Doctoral Student in History

Award Amount: $500

Exploring Mumblecore: Speed, Digital Cinema, Media Convergence and Counterpublics


My research seeks to understand the impact of speed on the production and consumption of cinematic and televisual texts. It explores the immediacy of digital media and new economic processes, and how they are informing structures of perception, as well as lending themselves to new and different ways of seeing the moving image in the digital age.   I used the Albert B. Friedman Grant to present a chapter from my dissertation on a group of DIY (Do-It-Yourself) filmmakers called “mumblecore” at the Cultural Studies Association conference in San Diego. Digital technologies have assisted many practitioners of cinema to cheaply produce and promote their works to a larger audience. Mumblecore filmmakers, in particular, are a significant example of underground artists who have carved their own social space through the immediacy of digital communication technologies such as the Internet, mobile screens, and desktop editing. Currently I am co-authoring an article with Professor Henry Krips on this topic. We are using mumblecore as a case study to explore the political and philosophical dimension of the production, circulation and reception of these films within digital media. Our abstract was accepted by Université de Montréal’s film studies journal, Cinémas, and the article will be published in 2015.


Photo of Kaileena Flores-EmnaceKaileena Flores-Emnace

Master's Student in Arts Management

and

Pablo Alvarez

Doctoral Student in Cultural Studies

Award Amount: $1,000

re:present L.A.


The exhibition re:present L.A. was successfully executed by the students of the Spring 2012 Cultural Studies course "Welcome to LA: Culture, Civic, and Community Practices in a City of Dreams" with the support of the Friedman Grant.  The exhibition took place from May 2 - June 9, 2012 at the Vincent Price Art Museum, bringing together the CGU community with the communities of East Los Angeles.  Re:present L.A. explored, challenged and employed the multiple representations of cultural production and social imaginaries of Los Angeles.  The exhibition included 27 artists, one archival display and an interactive component that invited visitors to create their own reprsentations of Los Angeles.  The opening reception had over 400 in attendance and included live music and silk screening.  The exhibition concluded with a Family Day that brought over 100 community members to VPAM to participate in art making with re:present L.A. artists and the mobile art studio, Mobile Mural Lab.  The project was documented through a website containing exhibition essays from each student-curator. 


Photo of Elwing GonzalezElwing Gonzalez

Doctoral Student in History

Award Amount: $500

Present Paper at History Conference at University of Massachusetts


My grant was used to help pay for transportation to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst Graduate Student History Conference (Networks, Connections, and Exchange: Historical Perspectives) in March 2012 to present my paper entitled, "Odd Man Out: Shifting Notations of Culture, Community, and Marginalization in Alhambra, California, 1940s to 1990s."  After attending this conference and receiving great faculty and peer input, I continued working on my paper and presented my updated version of it at the Social Studies History Association's 37th Annual Conference in November 2012 in Vancouver, British Columbia.  I plan on continuing my work on the development of ethnic enclaves in Los Angeles suburbs in the twentieth century and branching off into a more detailed examination of Vietnamese community in Southern California. 


Photo of Takeshi KanemuraTakeshi Kanemura

Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art Student

Award Amount: $1,500

Applying the Healing Power of Performance to Community


I am proposing to showcase performances in Japan and research how my performances can create an action/reaction for viewers and change audiences’ perspectives. During the last summer, I traveled to Japan to collaborate with local artists. This proved to be a huge influence on how I viewed myself as an artist, and changed my art direction towards the outlook of community. I have reached an open-conversation concept towards my art. I want to offer open conversation as a free dialog for my American audience(s) and colleagues; as a result, they will have started to see art through different perspectives. Specifically speaking for Japan, it is a very artistic and visually aesthetic nation, but in terms of live and social entertainment, the Japanese as an audience are less willing participants for interaction with artists, especially non-traditional and Westernized. I wanted to see if my performance as a fellow Japanese could allow Japanese audiences to look beyond politely and conservatively examining art.


Photo of Stephanie MeredithStephanie Meredith

Master of Fine Arts Student

Award Amount: $1,500

Artists Run Alternative Spaces Research Project


My research project consisted of investigating artist run gallery spaces, and the fundamentals of how they operate, fund themselves, and function within the greater artistic community.  To do this I went to New York were I met and interviewed multiple directors of artist run spaces, including Mathew Deleget from Minus Space and Deborah Brown from Store Front Bushwick Gallery.   This experience and research has helped me form a plan for creating my own artist run space and how I can foster community within the greater LA art world.


Michael Petitti

Doctoral Student in Cultural Studies

Award Amount: $2,000

Dissertation Research


My dissertation is concerned with exploitation and the American cinema of the 1970s—not, strictly, American exploitation cinema of the 1970s. As such, much of my research has involved significant archival work about the American film industry during this era, including examining documents from mainstream, independent, and underground films and companies from the period. The Friedman grant has significantly helped me fund the archival trips, expenses for interviews, and printing costs involved in my research. This grant has helped with my research of Hollywood exploitation at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as well as the Warner Bros. studio archives. The grant has also aided with my extensive research of the American International Pictures collection at Loyola Marymount University’s Archives and Special Collections. Furthermore, I was even able to use my funds to conduct an interview with writer/director Ralph Bakshi (Fritz the Cat, Heavy Traffic). As my dissertation is reevaluating exploitation and the American cinema of the 1970s, I am indebted to the Friedman grant for providing me with the resources to pursue every archival and research lead necessary to shaping and solidifying my project.


Photo of Foothill GroupKevin Riel

Doctoral Student in English

Award Amount: $1,000

Foothill: a journal of poetry


While the vast majority of literary journals never make it beyond their first issue, 2012 was a landmark year for us as we published our second and third online and print issues—a feat that would not have been possible without the Albert B. Friedman Award. The funds helped defray printing costs of the journal, submission fliers, and other promotional materials. In addition, copies of the journal (along with “Thank you” letters and fliers) were sent to every English program that had a poet whose work we published. Select prestigious MFA programs were also sent copies along with an introductory letter and fliers. Lastly, in an effort to boost readership and submissions, we spent a small sum on a Facebook ad campaign focused on graduate students with an interest in poetry. Our outreach paid off, as our submission totals for the third issue are almost triple the first issue’s, and we are presently drowning in submissions for our fourth issue. We are also proud to have hosted our first poetry reading and art show—in collaboration with the Kingsley and Kate Tufts Awards and the CGU Art Department—in October that was a huge success. We look forward to our next reading—another collaboration, this time with Poetry in Claremont—on April 28 to commemorate the publication of our fourth issue. We hope to see you there.


Photo of Philemon RohPhilemon Roh

Doctoral Student in English

Award Amount: $500

Travel Support for Seattle Pacific Conference and Dissertation Research in Texas


The Albert B. Friedman Grant afforded me the opportunity to travel to the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin to research the archive of the late David Foster Wallace. Researching the archive allowed me to investigate, in a more substantive manner, Wallace's complex place in the landscape of contemporary American literature. Not only did I have access to his handwritten notes, outlines, and drafts, I also had access to books from his personal library and his letters. Reading these correspondences, especially, has proven invaluable in garnering a more nuanced understanding of Wallace’s approach to writing and his more personal struggles as a writer. Additionally, while my initial purpose for the trip was quite narrow—I wanted to focus only on Wallace—I found myself with unparalleled access to an even wider range of materials beyond the Wallace, like the archives of Don DeLillo, Denis Johnson, and Norman Mailer, to name a few. This extended research has helped bring about a much-needed depth to my dissertation on the sociology of contemporary American literature after 9/11 and the ways in which these writers respond to reality and represent history.


Photo of Davina WardenDavina Warden

Doctoral Student in English

Award Amount: $2,500

Conflicting Natures: The Discourse of Nature in Representations of Pacific Exploration, Contact and Exchange

The funds from the Albert B. Friedman Grant provided me the opportunity to conduct dissertation research in London at the British Library and the School of Oriental and African Studies where the Council for World Mission Archives are housed. My dissertation explores the representation of Pacific Island cultures and environments that were presented through various accounts of British travelers, naturalists, and missionaries who voyaged to Oceania from the late 1760s to the 1850s, as well as literary renderings of the South Sea offered in the works of European and American writers. My archival work at SOAS was related to Chapter 5 of my dissertation, which focuses on the missionary endeavor in the South Pacific and the strategies employed by the brethren of the London Missionary Society to convert Pacific Island societies to Christianity. I read extensively in the materials (the Reports  and Transactions of the London Missionary Society) produced by the Society that were intended to guide missionaries in the education and conversion of the islanders and to inform British donors of the progress of the missionary endeavor in Tahiti and elsewhere. I also was able to examine several boxes of handwritten journals and correspondence of the missionaries stationed at various South Sea outposts, including Tahiti, Moorea, Huahine, and Raiatea. My research at the British Library contributed to the development of the additional proposed chapters of my dissertation. At the BL, I was able to access additional sermons and LMS publications, travel narratives, and correspondence of voyagers to the Pacific. These materials included the Indian and Pacific correspondence of Sir Joseph Banks, the letters of William Bligh, the journal of Sydney Parkinson, and pamphlets, articles, and documents related to the Bounty’s breadfruit mission to Tahiti in 1789, the infamous mutiny, and the subsequent capture and court martial of the mutineers. 


 

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