Social Identity Lab

The social identity lab, directed by Dr. Michael Hogg and managed by Tamara Duggan-Herd, is a center for social psychological research on group processes, intergroup relations, and the self-concept. Research is explicitly framed and directed by a focus on social identity processes and on the conceptual development of our understanding of these processes. Our research has a broad focus on: (1) influence processes within and between groups; (2) the motivational role played by self-uncertainty in group behavior, intergroup relations and self-conception; and (3) the structure of self-conception and identity in group and intergroup contexts.


These broad research agendas generate a wide range of more specific foci that include: leadership within and between groups; minority influence and social change; deviance, marginalization and group structure; multiple identities and identity complexity; social extremism and ideological orthodoxy; religious and political identity; human migration and ethnicity; vicarious cognitive dissonance; language, culture and identity; and social identity theory and uncertainty-identity theory themselves.

The social identity lab has an extensive network of active collaborations with universities in the UK [University of Kent (Dominic Abrams), University of Sheffield (Richard Crisp and David Rast), and Aston Business School (Robin Martin)], the Netherlands (Rotterdam School of Management (Daan van Knippenberg and Steffen Giessner), and Greece (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Antonis Gardikiotis). We also have collaborative links with universities in the US [Texas Tech University (Zach Hohman) and California University of Pennsylvania (Justin Hackett)] and we have periodic joint meetings with Brenda Major’s lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and with the intergroup relations group at the University of California, Los Angeles.


For photos of the lab in action, click here.

Lab Manager

Tamara Duggan-Herd studies deviance and marginalization in groups, with a specific focus on conflicting social identities (e.g., Christian-homosexuals) and intergroup relations, as well as the role of social identity processes in the same-sex marriage debate. She is also interested in the role of social identity processes in coaching and athletic team performance. When not in the lab, Tammy is a Crossfit coach and competes in Olympic Weightlifting. She is currently the California state silver medalist in the 48kg class.

Jung, J., Duggan-Herd, T. L., & Hogg, M. A (under review). Subtype or Secede? Group Responses to Changes in Shared Beliefs.

Duggan-Herd, T. L. (2013, May). Becoming an American through ingroup exclusion. Invited talk given at Özyeğin University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Duggan-Herd, T. L., & Hogg, M. A. (2013, January). Gay Christians on the outs: Conflicting social identities and intergroup relations. Paper presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations preconference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology annual conference, New Orleans, LA.

Duggan-Herd, T. L., & Hogg, M. A. (2012, April). Gay Christian- Friend or foe? Conflicting social identities and intergroup relations. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Graduate lab members

Yasemin Acar researches real world manifestations of intergroup relations and social identity dynamics. She is particularlyinterested in identity in the context of activism and protest, and isstudying the 2013 Gezi Park protests that started in Istanbul and spread to the rest of Turkey.Yasemin is a lecturer at Özyeğin University in Istanbul, where for "the sake of science" she has learned how to properlydeal with tear gas and build communes in public parks.

Acar, Y. G. (2012, July). Ethnic and national identification in Turkey: Perceived threat in the form of extremism and separatism and its consequences for the ethnic minority. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Chicago, IL.

Acar, Y. G. (2012, April). Türkiye’de Etnik ve Ulusal Kimlik Tehdidi ve Sonuçları.Poster presented at 17. Ulusal Psikoloji Kongresi (17th Annual National Psychology Congress), Istanbul, Turkey.

Nicolas Barreto studies influence and communication within and between groups. Current studies focus on the interplay of status characteristics and social identity leadership attributes, and how they optimize people’s influence in small task-oriented decision-making groups.

Sucharita Belavadi investigates the role played by uncertainty in intergroup conflicts, especially in the context of Indian religious and language-based groups. Of particular interest is how groups perceive marginal ingroup members within the context of language and social identity. She is also currently studying group members' tendency to engage in competitive victimhood when involved in intergroup conflict. Sucharita is originally from Mumbai, India, and plans to conduct further research in the Indian subcontinent.

Tagler, M. J., Belavadi, S.V., Gammon, F. E., Munji, C. M., Edyvean, C., & Newby, K. L. (2009, May). Implicit and explicit attitudes toward the poor and middle class. Poster presented at the 21st Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco, CA.

Jared Chapman is studying extremism (e.g., religious, political, social movements). Jared is interested in how uncertainty may lead people to identify more strongly with extreme positions, and how stronger identification impacts attitudes and behaviors. His other interests include advocating for psychological science and filmmaking (see imdb.me/jaredkchapman or watch his short films at vimeo.com/redchapcreative).
He is currently in pre-production for a documentary film called "I'm not that kind of psychologist: A look at psychological science in America”.

Chapman, J. K., Goldman, L., Haller, J., & Matelski, M. (2011, May). Understanding attitudes toward the Ground Zero Mosque: A theoretical model. Paper presented at the Western Psychological Association Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Chapman, J.K., Packard, C., Coaxum, B., & Crano, W. D. (2012, April). Revisiting psychology’s public image: Science versus practice. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association Convention, San Francisco, USA.

Chapman, J. K. & Hogg, M. A. (2012, January). Influence of religious and spiritual strength on religious identification and group-protective expression following self-uncertainty. Poster presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Convention, San Diego, USA.

Chapman, J. K.,& Duran, A. (2009, April). Exposure to intergroup interactions combined with feedback facilitates tolerance and acceptance. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association Convention, Portland, OR.

Andrew de Jesus studies cultural diversity and international travel and how they impact divergent thinking and behavior. He is currently working on expanding his master's thesis which investigates the effects of exposure to heterogeneity on creativity. On the side, Andrew also investigates predictors of healthy childhood development in developing nations. In what little free time he has, Andrew can be found ballroom dancing (mostly west coast swing), cycling, or practicing guitar/piano.

de Jesus, A. J., & Hogg, M. A. (2013, April). Exposure to heterogeneity facilitates creativity. Poster presented at the 2013 Western Psychological Association Conference, Reno, NV.

de Jesus, A. J. (2012, April). Childhood cognitive development in the global community. Poster presented at the 2012 Western Psychological Association Conference, Burlingame, CA.

Amber Gaffney researches social influence, including leadership and minority influence from a social identity perspective. She studies how prototypical and non-prototypical group members can create and manage uncertainty to enact social change.When not in the lab, Amber is on her bike racing professionally on the road and on the track. She holds two bronze national titles on the track.

Gaffney, A. M., Rast, D. E. III, Hacket, J. D., & Hogg, M. A. (in press). Further to the right: Uncertainty, political polarization, and the American Tea Party movement. Social Influence.

Hogg, M. A., & Gaffney, A. (2014). Prototype-based social comparisons within groups: Constructing social identity to reduce self-uncertainty. In Z. Križan & F. X. Gibbons (Eds.), Communal functions of social comparison (pp. 145-174). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Rast, D. E. III, Gaffney, A. M., &Hogg, M. A. (2013). The tyranny of social distance: A social identity account of the exercise of power by remote leaders. In M. C. Bligh & R. E. Riggio (Eds.), When near is far and far is near: Exploring distance in leader-follower relationships. Boston: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rast, D. E. III, Gaffney, A. M., Hogg, M. A., & Crisp, R. J. (2012). Leadership under uncertainty: When leaders who are non-prototypical group members can gain support. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 646-653.

Bligh, M. C., Casad, B. J., Schlehofer, M. M., & Gaffney, A. M. (2012). Competent enough, but would you vote for her? Gender stereotypes, political affiliation, and media influences on perceptions of women senators.Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 42, 560-597.

Gaffney, A. M., Hogg, M. A., Stone, J., & Copper, J. (2012). Witness to hypocrisy: Reacting to ingroup hypocrites in the presence of others. Social Influence, 7, 98-112.

Gaffney, A. M. and Blaylock, D. L. (2010). Hillary Clinton’s race: Did she match the presidential prototype? Advancing Women in Leadership Journal, 30(6).

Aberson, C. L. & Gaffney, A. M, (2009). An integrated threat model of explicit and implicitattitudes. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39, 808-830.

Liran Goldman studies extreme behaviors andgroup dynamics- specifically, what motivates people to join a terrorist organization or gangand, once integrated in the group, who is most likely to commit violent acts versus promote the group's ideology. Her dissertation explores the relationship between prototypicality, uncertainty, identity, and extreme behaviors. Liran is the recipient of a Department of Homeland Security Fellowship as well as a START (Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism) Research Award. Liran spends her spare time perfecting her cookie-dough-cheesecake-bite recipe.

Goldman, L. (2014). Spotting and countering prisoner radicalization: The US experience. In A. Silke (Ed.), Prisons, Terrorism, and Extremism: Critical Issues in Management, Radicalization, and Reform. London: Routledge.

Goldman, L., Giles, H., & Hogg, M. (under revision). Going to extremes: Social identity and communication processes associated with gang membership. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.

Goldman, L., Hogg, M. A., & Lemieux, A. (2011, September). Understanding terrorism: Effects of relative deprivation and social marginalization on extreme behaviors. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), Washington, DC.

Goldman, L. (2011, July). Not created equal: Differences across Islamic and non-Islamic terrorist organizations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Political Psychology (ISPP), Istanbul, Turkey.

Goldman, L. & Hogg, M. A. (2011, July). Understanding terrorism: Effects of relative deprivation and social marginalization on extreme behaviors. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Political Psychology (ISPP), Istanbul, Turkey.

Goldman, L. & Hogg, M. A. (2010, April). Understanding terrorism: Effects of relative deprivation and social marginalization on extreme behaviors. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association (WPA), Cancun, Mexico.

Fiona Grant studies social identity processes in health contexts, specifically the role of group membership in health promotion and exercise behavior. She also conducts research on social identity complexity and the way in which people cope with multiple identities during times of uncertainty. She is the founder and director of the Claremont Fitness and Wellness Club where she applies her research to motivate graduate students to lead healthy lifestyles.

Grant, F., & Hogg, M. A. (2012). Self-uncertainty, social identity prominence and group identification..Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 538 - 542

Grant, F. (2012, January). Group identification, self-efficacy and physical activity. Paper presented at the Social personality and Health preconference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology annual conference, San Diego, USA.

Grant, F. Collective/Social Identity (2011). In R. Jackson (Eds.). Encyclopedia of the self and identity. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE

Grant, F., & Hogg, M.A. (2011, July). Self- uncertainty, social identity prominence and group identification. Paper presented at the European Association of Social Psychology General Meeting, Stockholm, Sweden.

Grant, F., & Hogg, M.A. (2011, April). Self- uncertainty, social identity complexity and group identification. Paper presented at the Western Psychological Association conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Grant, F., & Hogg, M. A. (2010, April). Nationalism, uncertainty and social identity complexity. Paper presented at the Western Psychological Association conference, Cancun, Mexico.

Grant, F., & Hogg, M. A. (2010, January). Understanding nationalism: The roles of uncertainty and social identity complexity. Paper presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations preconference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.

Nicole Gray studies social identity complexity, the consequences of varying structures of identity, and the navigation of multiple, potentially conflicting social identities. She is also interested in minority groups' (e.g. racial/ethnic minorities, LGBT populations) experiences of community connectedness, identification, and general health and well-being.

Gray, N., & Hogg, M. A. (2012, January). Social identity complexity and the importance of leader prototypicality. Poster presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations Pre-conference at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

John Haller studies how uncertainty motivates group polarization and intensifies ideological belief and commitment. In addition he is interested in leadership as it relates to fostering intergroup cooperation. John conducts institutional research for Claremont McKenna college.

Haller, J. J., & Hogg, M. A. (in press). All power to our great leader: Political leadership under uncertainty. In J. W. van Prooijen & P. A. M. van Lange (Eds.), Power, politics, and paranoia: Why people are suspicious about their leaders. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Haller, J. J., & Hogg, M. A. (2011, July). Uncertainty, political ideology and social justice preferences. Paper presented at the 16th general meeting of the European Association of Social Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Lindsay Harris studies the impact of social identity on the educational experiences of minority students. Marshaling concepts such as stereotype threat, disidentification, and expectation bias, she researches variables that influence the academic aspirations and achievements of minority K-12 students. Lindsay collects her data in DC where she is currently working.

Harris, L., & Hogg, M. A. (2010, April). Identity and success: Effect of stereotype threat on urban students. Paper presented at the Western Psychological Association Conference, Cancun, Mexico.

Jiin Jung researches the impact of social identity related uncertainty on group identification, intergroup perceptions, and inclinations towards group integration and schism. Current research has been conducted in the context of Korean reunification and Scottish independence, with data collected in Seoul and Stirling. Jiin is also interested in computational models of social influence processes that address the interplay between mutual influence and global social change.

Jung, J., Hogg, M. A., & Choi, H-S. (under review). Reaching across the DMZ: Identity uncertainty and reunification on the Korean peninsula.

Jung, J., Herd, T, & Hogg, M. A. (under review). Subtype or Secede? Group Responses to Changes in Shared Beliefs.

Jung, J., Hogg, M. A., Choi, H-S., & Lewis, G. (2014, Feb). Identity uncertainty and group identification in the dual nested identity context of North-South Korea and Scotland-the UK Relations. Poster presented at the 14thAnnual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, TX.

Jung, J., Hogg, M. A., & Choi, H-S. (2012, July). Uncertainty-identification processes in the dual identity context. Paper presented at the 35thAnnual Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Chicago, IL.

Jung, J. & Choi, H-S. (2008, December). Putting the 'I' and the 'me' to the test: Impact of imagery perspectives on intention and behavior. Paper presented at the winter conference of the Korean Health Psychological Association, Seoul, Korea.

Choi, H-S. & Jung, J. (2008, December). Putting the 'I' and the 'me' to the test: Impact of imagery perspectives on intention and behavior. Paper presented at the winter conference of the Korean Association of Social and Personality Psychology, Seoul, Korea.

Monique Matelski researches collective narcissism, focusing on when and with what kind of groups people form narcissistic attachments, and what the consequences of such attachments are. She also applies social psychological research and theory to help solve social problems in areas of education and intergroup relations – a current project focuses on the validity of assumptions about causal processes underlying a Title V-funded educational program theory.

Matelski, M. H., Stopp, H.T., Haller, J. H., & Hogg, M.A. (2013, January). The effects of prototypicality and entitativity on collective narcissism. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, LA.

Matelski, M., & Hogg, M. A. (2012). Social psychology of group processes. In J. D. Wright (Ed.), International encyclopedia of social and behavioral sciences(2nd Ed.).New York: Elsevier.

Matelski, M., Eddy, R., M., & Ruitman, H. T. (2012, October). Responding to a call to action: Using social psychology to better understand program theory in a university-based tutoring program. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Evaluation Association, Minneapolis, MN.

Matelski, M., & Hogg, M. A. (2011, April). The power of collective emotions: Overcoming deterrents to political action. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Matelski, M., & Hogg, M. A. (2011, April). The power of collective emotions: Overcoming deterrents to political action. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Cody Packard is interested in reactance theory, as well as how morals influence behavior. Current research focuses on how reactance influences attitudes toward social policies, and how moral engagement in social issues is influenced by the cognitive availability of those issues. Additionally, he is developing a measure of negative attitudes toward the environment, and researching how negative environmental attitudes influence pro-environmental behavior. Cody is the lab’s expert on dogs and dogsports.

Packard, C. D., Coaxum, B., & Chapman, J. (2012, January). Opposition to legalizing same-sex partnerships: Threat and reactance. Poster presented at the 13th annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA. [Student Poster Award finalist]

Packard, C. D., & Omoto, A. M. (2012, April). Feeling socially connected and environmental action among different ethnic groups. Poster presented at the 92nd annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Burlingame, CA. [Student Scholarship Award winner]

Anderson, K. G., Duncan, K. D., Buras, M., Packard, C., D., & Kennedy, C. (2013). C-SIDE: Drinking simulation for college students.Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74, 94-103.

Jeff Ramdass studies identity complexity and unethical behaviors. Specifically, he investigates what makes people choose to partake in behaviors they know to be determined unethical by the majority group in order to maintain a high-priority identity status. Other interests include photography and traveling across the USA and abroad, having already visited over 15 states and 15 countries.

Mark Rinella studies subjective group dynamics and intergroup negotiations. Current studies focus on the effectiveness of in-group pro-norm and anti-norm deviants in negotiations with out-group pro-norm and anti-norm deviants. In his free time he enjoys the outdoors or watching a good movie.

David Somlo studies the role of self-construal and (social) identity processes in motivating pro-social and pro-environmental behavior, and how these processes and motivations are involved in small group decision-making and multi-party negotiation and conflict resolution. David is also interested in the social identity approach to deviance and attitude change. David worked as both a journalist and a musician before becoming a graduate student.

Somlo, D., & Omoto, A. (2012, June). Group identification and normative concern interact to predict environmental behavior. Paper presentedat the 9th biennial meeting of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Charlotte, NC.

Megan Stafford studies social identity in immigration contexts. Her previous research focused on ways in which the national identity of members of a host nation affect perceptions and acceptance of new immigrants. One of her current projects is looking at the negotiation of multiple minority identities for undocumented queer youth. Other research foci include social class as a social identity and the interaction of social psychology and public policy. Megan also makes a delicious apple pie.

Stafford, M. L., & Hogg, M. A. (2012, June). The importance of norms in determining attitudes towards immigrants. Poster presented at the biannual meeting of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Charlotte, NC.

Heather Stopp studies how contact with identity symbols, such as language as a core ethno-cultural attribute, influence intergroup attitudes and group identification. Specifically, she researches the role uncertainty and socio-structural factors play in determining whether contact with an outgroup identity symbol improves or impairs broader intergroup relations. Heather is currently collecting data in Pennsylvania. In her spare time, Heather enjoys traveling throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Lienneman, B. A., & Stopp, H. T. (2013). The association between extended contact with interracial relationships via media portrayals and attitudes toward interracial relationships. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 43, 398-415.

Stopp, H. T., Matelski, M. H., Haller, J. H., & Hogg, M.A. (2013, January). How can I belong?: The impact of prototypicality, identification, and need to belong on collective narcissism. Poster presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations Preconference at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, LA.

Stopp, H. T. (2012, April). Association between intergroup contact and American identification for Latinos. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Stopp, H. T. (2012, January). To feel American: The interplay of skin-tone and majority group contact’s association with identification as an American. Poster presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations Pre-conference at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

Stopp, H. T., & Hogg, M.A. (2011, May). Se habla español: Association between language contact and Latino attitudes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Stopp, H. T. (2010). Self-Monitoring. In R. L. Jackson, III, (Ed.), Encyclopedia of identity. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Stopp, H.T., & Lienemann, B. A. (2010, April). The association between media portrayal exposure and interracial relationship acceptance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Cancun, Mexico

Stopp, H. T., & Hogg, M. A. (2009, February). Languages Collide: Does interpersonal or group contact best predict Latino Attitudes? Poster presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations Pre-conference at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Tampa, FL.

Lindsey, E. W., & Stopp, H. T. (2008). Friendships. In N. J. Salkind (Ed.), Encyclopedia of educational psychology. Boston, MA; Blackwell.

Jessica J. Tomory researches leadership and social identity processes within and between groups. She is particularly interested in factors that strengthen or weaken followers’ trust in their leader(s). She is currently exploring how follower cognition impacts perceptions and evaluations of prototypical versus non-prototypical leaders when self-uncertainty is high. Jessica is actively involved in collaborative research with colleagues at the University of Sheffield, UK, and is an avid tennis player.

Rast, D. E. III, Hogg, M. A., & Tomory, J.J. (under review). Prototypical leaders do not always get our support: Impact of self-uncertainty and need for cognition. British Journal of Social Psychology.

Tomory, J.J., & Hogg, M.A. (2014, Feb). Strongly identified followers are most supportive of a leader who is legitimate and group prototypical. Paper accepted at the annual Society for Personality and Social Psychology Meeting in Austin, TX.

 

 

Joey Wagoner studies the process of schism, or how subgroups exit their larger superordinate group. He also investigates how uncertainty influences group identification processes, and attraction to extreme groups and ideologies. He currently holds a part-time lecturer position at CSU Fullerton. With his free time, he enjoys being outside and playing board games (but not simultaneously).

Hogg, M. A., & Wagoner, J. A. (in press). Social exclusion and attraction to extreme groups. In K. D. Williams & S. A. Nida (Eds.), Ostracism, social exclusion and rejection. New York: Psychology Press.

Litchenstein, R., Wagoner, J. A., & Levine, R. (2013, April). Teaching psychology online: Exploration and analysis of online education resources. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association conference, Reno, NV.

Wagoner, J. A., & Levine, R. (2012, April). Social identity maintenance in post-genocide societies: The role of perceived social inequality and the ultimate attribution error. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association conference, San Francisco, CA.

Holliday, R., Wagoner, J. A., & Edmonson. (2011, November). Negative social stigma and stereotyping against mental illnesses and psychiatric drugs. Poster presented at the 24thU.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress, Las Vegas, NV.

Wagoner, J. A., & Levine, R. (2011, April). Non-religious attributions to ambiguous situations. Poster presented at the Western Psychological Association conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Jennifer Williams studies how people understand and react to social categories, with a specific focus on stereotyping and stigma, group dynamics, and community action. She is currently researching the effect of sexist humor on identity and stereotype threat. Additionally, she is studying the effects of traumatic experiences (such as crime or illness) on identity, sense of community, and volunteerism.Jennifer is the lab’s ferret expert.

Williams, J.R., Goddard, P., & Fuegen, K. (November, 2012). Drugs are disgusting! Moral decision making and attitudes toward drug use and harm reduction. Paper presented at the 2012 National Harm Reduction Conference, Portland, OR.

Benham, L., & Williams, J.R. (2011). The selectively truncated middleman minority: Trafficking in black female sexuality. The Griot, 59-70.

Lipsitz, A., Williams, J. R., Cannava, K. E., & Lutes, D. (May, 2011). Doctor, get your gun! Portrayal of forensic psychology professionals in recent films. Poster presented at the 2011 Association for Psychological Science annual conference, Washington, DC.

Dirr, B., Williams, J.R, Wilkinson, C., & Fuegen, K. (May, 2011). Framing effects on employment decisions. Poster presented at the 2011 Midwestern Psychological Association annual conference, Chicago, IL.

Benham, L. &Williams, J. (April, 2010). Toward a theory of utilitarian truncated intermediary minorities.Paper presented at the 2010 annual Midwestern Political Science Association conference, Chicago, IL.

Adjunct lab members

Janice Adelman, a past member of the lab, is a Senior Research Analyst with the CITI Program at the University of Miami. Her research incorporates both social identity and uncertainty as factors related to a range of social behaviors, from political violence to research misconduct. She is the current newsletter editor for the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI). Outside of academia, Janice is a certified West Coast Swing Dance instructor and teaches Ballet Fitness classes at Barrebox in Miami.

Hogg, M. A., & Adelman, J. R. (2013). Uncertainty-identity theory: Extreme groups, radical behavior and authoritarian leadership. Journal of Social Issues, 69, 436-454.

Victoroff, J., Adelman, J. R., & Matthews, M. (2012). Psychological factors associated with support for suicide bombing in the Muslim diaspora. Political Psychology, 33, 791-809.

Hogg, M. A., Adelman, J. R., & Blagg, R. D. (2010). Religion in the face of uncertainty: An uncertainty-identity theory account of religiousness. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 14, 72-83.

Zachary Hohman is a past member of the lab and currently an assistant professor of experimental psychology at Texas Tech University. His research focuses on group processes, intergroup relations and the self-concept, and also the role played by attitudes and persuasion. Zach is also interested in how these processes play out in health contexts. Current research has a broad focus on: (1) influence processes within and between groups; (2) the motivational role played by self-uncertainty in group behavior, intergroup relations and self-conception; and (3) the structure of self-conception and identity in group and intergroup contexts.

Hohman, Z. P., Crano, W. D., Alvaro, E. A., & Siegel, J. T. (2013). Attitudinal ambivalence, friend norms, and adolescent drug use.Journal of Prevention Science. Advanced online publication.

Miller, S. M., Siegel, J. T., Hohman, Z. P., & Crano, W. D. (2013). Factors mediating the association of parent’s marijuana use and their adolescent children’s subsequent initiation. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.Advanced online publication.

Alvaro, E. A., Crano, W. D., Siegel, J. T., Hohman, Z. P., Johnson, I., Nakawaki, B. (2013). Adolescent attitudes toward anti-marijuana ads, use intentions, and actual marijuana usage. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. Advanced online publication.

Hohman, Z. P., & Hogg, M. A. (2011). Fear and uncertainty in the face of death: The role of life after death in group identification. European Journal of Social Psychology, 41,751-760.

Hogg, M. A., Siegel, J. T., & Hohman, Z. P. (2011). Groups can jeopardize your health: Identifying with un-healthy groups to reduce self-uncertainty. Self and Identity, 10, 326-335.

Hohman, Z. P., Hogg, M.A., & Bligh, M. C. (2010). Identity and intergroup leadership: Asymmetrical political and national identification in response to uncertainty. Self and Identity, 9, 113-128.

Hogg, M. A., Hohman, Z. P., & Rivera, J. E. (2008). Why do people join groups: Three motivational accounts from social psychology. Social Psychology and Personality Compass, 2/3,1269-1280.

David Rast is an Assistant Professor of Organizational Psychology and Leadership in the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP) at the University of Sheffield, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.His research examines (a) the conditions under which deviant or non-prototypical leaders become influential within groups; and (b) how leaders transcend conflict-charged intergroup relations to build followers’ commitment to an overarching group vision.

Rast, D. E. III, Hogg, M. A., & Giessner, S. R. (in press). Leadership under uncertainty: The appeal of strong leaders and clear identities. Self and Identity.

Rast, D. E. III, Gaffney, A. M., Hogg, M. A., & Crisp, R. J. (2012). Leadership under uncertainty: When leaders who are non-prototypical group members can gain support. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 646-653.

Hogg, M. A., van Knippenberg, D., & Rast, D. E. III (2012). Intergroup leadership in organizations: Leading across group and organizational boundaries. Academy of Management Review, 37, 232-255.

Hogg, M. A., van Knippenberg, D., & Rast, D. E. III. (2012). The social identity theory of leadership: Theoretical origins, research findings, and conceptual developments. European Review of Social Psychology, 23, 258-304.

Viviane Seyranian is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Southern California. Her research examines the role of specific communication tactics and source types (e.g., majorities, minorities, leaders, ingroup-outgroups) on attitudes, emotions, knowledge, cognitive processing, and behaviors. Viviane is testing a theory called social identity framing, which outlines a series of communication tactics related to social identity that may help to encourage attitudinal and behavioral change.

Seyranian, V. (under revision). Social identity framing communication strategies for mobilizing social change. The Leadership Quarterly.

Lombardi, D.,Seyranian, V., & Sinatra, G. (in press). Source effects and plausibility judgments when reading about climate change. Discourse Processes.

Seyranian, V. (in press). Social Identity Framing: A strategy of social influence for social change. In R.E. Riggio & S. J. Tan (Eds.), Leader interpersonal and influence skills: The soft skills of leadership. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Seyranian, V. (2012). Constructing extremism: Uncertainty provocation and reduction by extremist leaders. In M.A. Hogg & D. Blaylock (Eds.), The psychology of uncertainty and extremism (pp.228-245). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Crano, W. D., & Seyranian, V. (2009). How minorities prevail: The context/comparison-leniency contract model. Journal of Social Issues, 65,335-363.

Seyranian, V., & Bligh, M. C. (2008). Presidential charismatic leadership: Exploring the rhetoric of social change. The Leadership Quarterly, 19, 54-76.

Seyranian, V., Atuel, H., & Crano, W. D. (2008). Dimensions of majority and minority groups. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 11, 21-37.

Crano, W. D., & Seyranian, V. (2007). Majority and minority influence. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 1, 572-589.

Atuel, H., Seyranian, V., & Crano, W. D. (2007). Media representations of majority and minority groups. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 561-572.

Visiting Scholars

2014
Matteo Antonini (Sapienza Università di Roma)

2013

Vladimir Turjacanin (Banja Luka University, Bosnia and Herzegovina)
Madeleine Moret (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

2012

Robin Martin (Aston Business School, UK)
Camilo Cristancho Mantilla (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Spain)
Vladimir Turjacanin (Banja Luka University, Bosnia and Herzegovina)

2009

Daan van Knippenberg (Rotterdam School of Management, The Netherlands)

2008

Dominic Abrams (University of Kent, UK)
Robin Martin (Aston Business School, UK)
Marilynn Brewer (Ohio State University)

2007

Richard Crisp (University of Kent, UK)
David Sherman (University of California, Santa Barbara)

 

Past Members of the Lab

Robert Blagg Danielle Blaylock (Queens University, Belfast)
Justin Hackett (California University of Pennsylvania)
Carola Leicht (University of Kent, UK)
Namrata Mahajan (Arroyo Research Services)
Jason Rivera (Claremont Graduate University and Pitzer College)
Shirley Samson (University of Kent, UK)
Dana Turcotte (Netflix, Inc.)
Suzanne van Gils (Maastricht University, The Netherlands)