Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology

Enhancing Teaching and Learning: Lessons from Social Psychology

Abstracts

Keynote Addresses

Shining with Scholarship: Galvanizing Teaching and Learning with SoTL and Social Psychology
Dr. Regan Gurung, University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

How can the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) optimize teaching and enhance student learning? What exactly IS SoTL and how is it different from scholarly teaching? How can social psychology-its methodologies, theories, and major findings aid the art and craft of teaching and correspondingly influence student learning? In this presentation I shall demonstrate why both scholarly teaching and SoTL are valuable, and discuss how the subfield of social psychology (broadly defined) makes important contributions to both.

Academic Self-Concept: Models, Measurement, Influences and Enhancements
Dr. John Hattie, University of Auckland

This paper will elaborate on the meanings and measurement issues relating to academic self-concept; how it differs from self-estimate of ability, achievement self-concept, and academic self-efficacy; the relation and causal influences between academic self-concept and achievement; and the effectiveness of programs to enhance academic self-concept.

Relationships that Support Autonomy and Engagement
Dr. Johnmarshall Reeve, University of Iowa

Reflecting on the findings from experiments conducted in the laboratory, schools, home, and special settings such as fMRI brain scans, the talk first addresses the question, “From where does motivation come?” Reflections on these data draw attention to the need to understand the conditions in which people can generate motivation for themselves, a conclusion that focuses a spotlight on the important motivational role of interpersonal relationships. This focus leads to the talk’s second question, “What constitutes a high-quality, engagement-fostering relationship?” Taking a self-determination theory perspective and a practical tone from working with teachers, the talk focuses on the interpersonal effort to support autonomy in others. I explain what autonomy-supportive relationships are, what autonomy-supportive practitioners say and do, whether autonomy support can be learned, and what benefits accrue to recipients of autonomy support. I emphasize practical implications and applications of these ideas. Recommendations for promoting autonomy, motivation, and engagement in others will be a constant theme throughout the talk.

Can Students Learn to be Better Citizens and Better People? Only if We Teach for Long-Term Retention and Transfer
Dr. Diane F. Halpern, Claremont McKenna College

We are educating the citizens and work force of the next generation. If we want our students to use their knowledge to become better citizens and better people, we need to teach so that the learning lasts far beyond the end of the semester. In other words, we need to teach for long-term retention and transfer, especially when the goal is to have students apply their knowledge to a wide range of issues in varied contexts. Empirically-validated studies of learning have shown the benefits of spaced review, practice at retrieval, overlearning, varied examples presented without the usual classroom retrieval cues, meaningful processing, and use of multiple representations. By applying basic principles from the science of learning, we can have long-lasting positive effects on our students.

Panel Discussions

Panel: How Can Educators Best Support Student Well-Being?

Moderator: Dr. Elizabeth Yost Hammer, Xavier University of Louisiana
Discussants: Dr. Anthony Antonio, Standford University
Dr. Tracy McLaughlin-Volpe, Emerson College

Abstract: How and why do student experiences in higher-education differ? How can educators best support students well-being? Dr. Antonio and Dr. McLaughin-Volpe will consider these questions within the context of their own scholarship on diversity in higher education and socialization in multicultural environments (Antonio); and social identity and inter-group friendships (McLaughlin-Volpe). Each speaker will spend 15-minutes briefing the audience on her or his scholarship; then, the two speakers will respond to questions from each other, the audience, and the moderator.

Panel: How do Professors’ Behaviors Impact Student Motivation and Learning?

Moderator: Dr. Debra Mashek, Harvey Mudd College
Discussants: Dr. Elliott Hammer, Xavier University of Louisiana
Dr. Janie Wilson, Georgia Southern University

Abstract: How do professors’ behaviors impact student motivation and learning? How can professors bridge racial, ethnic, or generational divides? Dr. Hammer and Dr. Wilson will consider these questions within the context of their own scholarship on person perception, stereotyping, and prejudice (Hammer); and faculty/student rapport, student attitudes, and student motivation (Wilson). Each speaker will spend 15-minutes briefing the audience on her or his scholarship; then, the two speakers will respond to questions from each other, the audience, and the moderator.