Compleat Leader: Strategy and Planning

 

Strategic planning is concerned with ensuring relevance in an organization's future. Strategy includes defining mission, objectives and values, exploring strengths and weaknesses, available resources and future environment, and identifying where the organization wants to be in one, five, and ten years. A comprehensive implementation plan informs and translates the strategy into the realities of the organizational structure, systems, policies, products, and operations.

 

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Must Reads

resources compiled by National Arts Strategies and the Getty Leadership Institute

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Strategic Planning at the New York Botanical Garden Cases

By Jeanne M. Liedtka

This case series traces the formulation and implementation of a strategic plan for the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), and profiles, in detail, the highly inclusive and original planning process used. The NYBG planning process reflects many of the themes of creativity, inclusiveness, and vision that characterize the concepts of strategic thinking, collaboration, and empowerment so prevalent in recent business discussions. The A case opens in early 1993, and describes the process used to produce the plan, which included the participation of staff at every level. The B case takes place in 1997, five years into the plan's seven-year time horizon. It reviews the dramatic successes the plan has made possible at the Garden. The C case updates the series to November 2007 as the Garden's Board of Managers considers the latest strategic plan.

(A) Case: Social Science Research Network abstract and Darden Business Publishing ordering information

(B) Case: Social Science Research Network abstract and Darden Business Publishing ordering information

(C) Case: Social Science Research Network abstract and Darden Business Publishing ordering information

(Links take you to SSRN's site then to publisher's website.)

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Leading Innovation at Kelvingrove Cases

By Jeanne M. Liedtka

This case series explores the leadership story of director Mark O'Neill as he oversees a major innovation initiative at Kelvingrove, Scotland's most visited museum. The A case describes his background, philosophy, and the actions he takes over a period of more than a decade to win the support of both staff and funders for the innovation. The B case examines the reaction of the public and art critics. O'Neill arrives at Kelvingrove to find an institution in turmoil after a series of dramatic changes that have alienated visitors and funders alike. Utilizing an innovative style of management that he describes as 'maze behavior' he succeeds in moving the traditionally discipline-bound, curator-dominated museum into a cross-disciplinary, visitor-oriented experience. He does this by engaging the curators in creating exhibits based on stories rather than professional classification schemes such as paintings, geology, etc., using an approach that includes a deep understanding of his audience and the imaginative use of forms. He also gains the community's political and funding support to accomplish his goals.

(A) Case: Social Science Research Network abstract and Darden Business Publishing ordering information

(B) Case: Social Science Research Network abstract and Darden Business Publishing ordering information

(Links take you to SSRN's site then to publisher's website.)

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Linking Strategic Vision and Managerial Action: A Framework and Techniques for Strategy Implementation

By John C. Camillus

Full report
(Link takes you to publisher's website.)

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How the Arts Can Prosper Through Strategic Collaboration

By Joanne Scheff and Philip Kotler

Harvard Business Online abstract and ordering information
(Link takes you to publisher's website.)

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L.A. art ONLINE: Learning from the Getty's Electronic Cataloguing Initiative. A report from the Getty Foundation.

Written by Ann Schneider

Full report

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The Future by Design: GLI-sponsored session at the 2010 American Association of Museums Annual Meeting.

by Fred Dust of IDEO

Presentation Archive

(Link takes you to AAM’s section of Prolibrary, login required, purchase maybe necessary.)

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Set in Stone: Building America's Next Generation of Arts Facilities 1994-2008.

by University of Chicago Cultural Policy Center

"This study of cultural building began in 2006 as a response to inquiries from arts consultants who had for some time been working on dozens of building projects across the country and found themselves confronting the same sets of problems with each new client. In many cases, the actual need for a new facility had not been demonstrated (even though there was often great enthusiasm about getting underway with construction); the connection between a new facility and delivering more effectively on mission was in many instances quite murky; realism about how a new facility could be sustained once built was frequently missing – both in terms of the financial resources and staff needed to successfully run a new facility. The list goes on. New facilities would open, organizations would then run into financial problems because of insufficient revenue, or an inadequate endowment, or because they couldn’t service the debt they incurred to build, or because the building was too costly to operate, or it turned out to be beyond the organization’s capacity to administer and sustain..." See full report.

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Related Materials Under Other Topics

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