Compleat Leader: Trends

 

Trends are long-term movements, tendencies that point to a general direction in which something is developing or changing. Trends, as opposed to fads, surface and evolve over a prolonged period of time. Detecting them as early as possible is a continual pursuit.

 

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The Future of Museums

Philip M. Nowlen recorded for the Voices of the Future, a project of AAM's Center for the Future of Museums

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Cultural Organizations and Changing Leisure Trends,
A National Convening, Online Discussion and White Paper

 

In 2007, the Getty Leadership Institute and National Arts Strategies co-hosted a convening entitled, Cultural Organizations and Changing Leisure Trends. Leaders from arts, culture, media, academia and the creative for-profit sector across the country engaged one another in a series of conversations about the changing ways in which Americans spend their time. The group explored the facts and the strategies cultural organizations might consider to take advantage of new leisure trends or to reposition themselves over and against them.

Leisure in America: Searching for the Forest Amongst the Trees
a background paper produced for the Cultural Organizations and Changing Leisure Trends Convening hosted by National Arts Strategies and the Getty Leadership Institute.

By David Touve and Steven Tepper.
Edited by Russell Willis Taylor, President and CEO, National Arts Strategies,
and Philip Nowlen, Head Getty Leadership Institute.

Below is a contextualized laundry list of leisure and consumption trends in America. This list is by no means exhaustive (although it might be exhausting). As many of you know, there are thousands and thousands of pages of statistics, charts, and tables that document consumer and leisure trends—focusing on every conceivable demographic group... Rather than synthesize all of this work into a meaningful review (a task we found beyond the scope of this meeting), we have decided to provide you with snap shots representing different parts of the debate and research. You might think of this report as a type of “Harper's Index” on steroids—interesting tidbits enhanced by commentary and context...  Full text (456Kb).


White Paper
a summary report of the Cultural Organizations and Changing Leisure Trends Convening hosted by National Arts Strategies and the Getty Leadership Institute.

By Andrew Taylor
Edited by Russell Willis Taylor, President and CEO, National Arts Strategies,
and Philip Nowlen, Head Getty Leadership Institute

...Within these facts, trends, and insights, the conference participants narrowed their focus to the nonprofit and public 'cultural industries'—a small but significant sector intended to foster, produce, present, and preserve the expressive and interpretive lives of human society. They defined an industry infrastructure often heavy on the 'hardware' of cultural experience—facilities, objects, technical production spaces—but thin on the human and financial resources required to make full and adaptive use of that hardware. They expressed a general sense of growing disconnect between professional, established cultural organizations and the lives of their communities. And many wondered out loud whether our perceptions of decline in cultural participation were due to a flawed boundary to our analysis...By the end of day one, the group had come around to at least three clusters of opportunity for cultural organizations in all sectors—nonprofit, public, commercial, and informal. In the vastly changing and unpredictable world of leisure trends, these three clusters [were] Culture as respite...Culture as connector...Culture as continuum...  Full text (156Kb).


Blog
online discussion accompanying the Cultural Organizations and Changing Leisure Trends Convening hosted by National Arts Strategies and the Getty Leadership Institute.

 View the blog archive.(4.7Mb)

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Boomers and 13ers: When Museum Talents Converge
presentations at American Association of Museums Annual Meeting, 2007

13ers Presentation

By MiJin Hong

“13ers,” according to Strauss and Howe, are those born between 1961-1981. We are not shed in good light (probably because they are Boomers): “dumb, greedy, and soulless,” pragmatic and quick, scrutinizing and determined, informal and anti-institutional. They conclude by stating, we will “have a miserable old age”—not quite dinner party material...  Full text (45Kb).


Boomers Presentation

By Wendy Luke

Why don't you understand me? I'm a boomer. Depending on the expert you consult, boomers were born between 1946 and 1964 or 1943-1963. Or, maybe I'm a Traditionalist/Boomer Cusper (born between 1940 and 1945)...  Full text (20Kb).

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Generations, the History of America's Future, 1584 to 2069

By William Struass and Neil Howe

Book abstract and ordering information.

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Professional Development: Map or Compass

By Russell Willis Taylor, President and CEO, National Arts Strategies

...I want to talk about common ground—let you know a bit about National Arts Strategies, what we do and why, and talk about the larger issues facing the field of arts and culture that Phil and I try to address in our individual organizations. There are differences in the world of museums and galleries and the performing arts—I have worked in both—but there are more similarities than differences, and one of the greatest pleasures of my role at NAS since I returned to the United States seven years ago has been the opportunity to work with Phil and his very talented team to advance our field as a whole...  Full text (36Kb).

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ArtBabble

Created By Indianapolis Museum of Art

For videos about art, there's ArtBabble a Web site created by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Includes videos from sources such as the Museum of Modern Art and the PBS. Join in spreading the world of art through video.

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Related Materials Under Other Topics

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