Avoiding Pitfalls That Can Derail Your Business Nina B. Ries in conversation with Jonathan Jaffee Wednesday, May 1/2013

Partnership disputes as messy as the worst divorce, employee agreements gone wrong, personal bank accounts raided to pay business expenses, intellectual property stolen, claims and counterclaims over contracts…these are just some of the pitfalls of entrepreneurship. When you start a business, there are innumerable complex steps, and success often depends on understanding the intricacies of contracts, business torts, real estate deals, employment law, and much more.

In our latest Drucker Business Forum, attorney Nina Ries joins business law and strategy professor Jonathan Jaffee with lessons on how to avoid the hazards of new business start-up. Join us with your questions and get some concrete information on how to build a winning enterprise.

NINA B. RIES
Ries Law Group

Nina B. Ries has litigated a variety of complex matters and countless cases involving breaches of a variety of contracts, business torts, 17200 claims, real estate disputes, employment matters, class action defense and intellectual property (including trademark, trade secret and unfair competition) on behalf of entrepreneurs, small businesses and Fortune 500 companies.

Ms. Ries serves as General Counsel for a number of growing companies, providing comprehensive legal services spanning from advice and counsel to drafting and negotiating contracts, disclosures, warranties, waivers, releases and more. She has leveraged her litigation experience to identify clients' vulnerabilities and to craft innovative ways to mitigate these risks.

She has served on a number of Boards, including the Executive Board of the Los Angeles County Bar Association Barristers (2004-2009), the Editorial Board of Los Angeles Lawyer Magazine (2002-2003), the Executive Board of the USC Gould Law School Young Alumni Committee (2004-2012; co-chair 2011-2012), and has also served as a member of the Board of a nonprofit corporation (2006-2010).

Most recently, she helped to found the USC Law Alumni Association and serves as its president, receiving the Widney House Alumni Award for her work with the association. She has been admitted to both state and federal courts in California and is a member of the Los Angeles County Bar Association, the Los Angeles County Bar Association Barristers, the State Bar of California and the American Bar Association.

Nina Ries is a Southern California native. She attended college at the University of California at Irvine, where she triple-majored in Political Science (with honors), Philosophy and Sociology and was a member of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She attended law school at the University of Southern California, where she earned honors in several classes, including Contracts, Real Property and Remedies.

She is active with her sorority's alumnae association and within the Trojan family. In her leisure time, Ms. Ries enjoys attending sporting events, traveling and pursuing water-based sports, including snorkeling, kayaking and whitewater rafting. (Available http://www.rieslawgroup.com/principal.html)
JONATHAN JAFFEE
Drucker School of Management


Jonathan Jaffee is an assistant professor at the Drucker School of Management and specializes in business strategy, law & society, organization theory.

He was formerly on the faculties of the University of Southern California (Marshall School of Business) and Carnegie Mellon (Tepper School of Business), as well as being an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University (Graziadio School of Business). He is an active member of the California Bar Association, and has practiced law in both Los Angeles and Baltimore (Maryland), focusing on large-scale business litigation.

Professor Jaffee earned his law degree at UCLA and his PhD from Berkeley, Haas School of Business.

(Available http://www.cgu.edu/pages/8656.asp)
   

Brand Real: How Smart Companies Live Their Brand Promise Laurence Vincent in conversation with Matt DeBord
Thursday, February 28/2013


Apple or Android? Toyota or Jeep? Coke or Vitaminwater? Taco Bell or Chipotle? These days, consumers define themselves through brand choices, with the Internet throwing up new brands every day. No sooner had some chosen Facebook over Twitter than they discovered that Instagram was the new Facebook. Then Facebook was buying Instagram for $1 billion! What’s a brand-deluged consumer to do? And how can business leaders navigate this fast-changing landscape, so critical to success in a media age that’s characterized by capricious loyalties and nanosecond attention spans? If a company wants to be successful, behind all that edgy new branding should be a promise to deliver predictable value, a promise to stand up at every “customer touch point.” Matt DeBord, KPCC’s business and economics reporter, talks about it with brand strategist and author, Laurence Vincent, head of The Brand Studio at United Talent Agency. Join them in the Crawford Family Forum for our latest Drucker Business Forum as they dissect the elements of successful brands and what makes them work.

Laurence Vincent

Eric Ball
Laurence Vincent is head of The Brand Studio; over the past two decades, Larry has developed brand strategies for some of the world’s most famous brands, including CBS, Coca-Cola, Four Seasons Hotels, MasterCard, Microsoft, the National Football League, Sony Playstation, The Home Depot and vitamin water. His most recent book, Brand Real, was released in March 2012.





Matt DeBord

Jack Harding
Matthew DeBord has written about economics, business, and financial issues for publications including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, CBS.com, and the Huffington Post. In 2010, he began the DeBord Report for KPCC.org.

Matt has appeared frequently on KPCC to discuss business and the economy. He has also commented for NPR, KCRW’s “To the Point” with Warren Olney, “America Now with Andy Dean,” MSNBC, RT, Radio France, China Radio International, and the Tokyo Broadcasting System. He has moderated panels and conducted conversations at the Crawford Family Forum, as well as at the Drucker School and Art Center College of Design.

In recent years, he has covered the global automobile industry. He has also worked in marketing, advertising, and communications, developing blogging and social-media strategies and platforms.

A graduate of Clemson and New York universities, Matt has written about environmental finance and presented at national conferences on the carbon economy and sustainability. He spent three years on staff at Wine Spectator magazine and is the author of The New York Book of Wine and Wine Country USA.

DeBord is also known to enjoy playing (and writing about) golf, tennis, and squash. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Maria Russo, and their three young children.


Thursday, January 24/2013

Unlocking the Ivory Tower - Management Research can Transform your Business

Eric R. Ball and Joseph A. LiPuma in conversation with Professor Bernie Jaworski

Unlocking the Ivory Tower – making management research accessible to those actually managing organizations, and interpreting that knowledge for practical application is a continuing challenge in today’s economy. In their new book, Eric Ball and Joseph LiPuma meet that challenge as they act as field guides and interpreters to bridge the divide between scholarship and practice, as they address research on strategy, leadership, entrepreneurship, organizational theory, international business, innovation, and finance.

Both have helped create, develop, and run organizations and they have executive experience in finance, mergers and acquisitions, and entrepreneurship in international contexts. They bring that combined knowledge to help managers who are faced with responsibilities for functional and staff management, as well as developing strategies for growth, leading teams, and staying competitive in evolving industries and markets globally.

Bring your questions for Eric and Joe and join them in the Crawford Family Forum as they talk with Claremont Graduate University’s professor of management, Bernie Jaworski about how to open the doors of that Ivory Tower and put research to work.

Eric R. Ball PhD: Senior Vice-President, Treasurer and member of the Society of Kauffman Fellows at Oracle.

 

Eric Ball
Eric Ball was born in 1964 in Detroit and grew up in Michigan. Since then, he has lived in upstate New York, suburban New Jersey, Los Angeles, rural England, and since 1999 in Silicon Valley. He has studied and taught at five universities, worked in five large corporations, and invested in several startups.

Along the way, he married Sheryl Axline in 2001, experienced altitude sickness on more than one continent, failed to get on "Survivor", and fathered two active boys now aged 5 and 9. He spent more than a decade earning his doctorate, and four years earning his pilot's license. Eric lives, plays, and practices parenting in Menlo Park, California. He works for Oracle Corporation in Redwood Shores, California.

In 2011 Eric Ball was named as one of the “100 Most Influential People in Finance” by the editors of CRO and Treasury & Risk Management magazines. He is a graduate of Claremont’s Graduate School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.

 

Joseph A. LiPuma, DBA: Associate Professor and Director of the International MBA Program at EMLYON Business School, Ecully, France.

 

LiPuma
Joseph LiPuma's research focuses on the resources underpinning new venture internationalization. He is also the author, with Eric Ball, of Unlocking the Ivory Tower: How Management Research Can Transform Your Business. Joe directs EMLYON's International MBA program, and teaches Business Strategy and Policy, International Business, Entrepreneurship, and Managing Innovation.

Prior to earning his Doctor of Business Administration, Joe had more than 25 years of business experience, much of it in information technology, including executive management and board-level roles in both the United States and abroad. He established new businesses in the United States, United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, and Italy, has traveled extensively, and currently lives in France.

 

Bernie Jaworski, is the Peter F. Drucker Chair of Management and Liberal Arts at the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management

 

Jaworski

Professor Jaworski came to CGU from the Switzerland-based IMD, a highly regarded international business school. As the school's executive vice president for North America, he both taught courses and helped to expand the school's reach into the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Prior to working at IMD, Jaworski spent a decade as a senior partner of the Monitor Group, a global management consulting firm. During his Monitor career, he co-founded and co-led two of the global practice areas – the e-commerce practice and the executive education unit. Among other activities, he was a senior team member of a number of significant, multi-year corporate transformations.

From 1996 to 1999, Jaworski served as the Jeanne and David Tappan Marketing Fellow and a tenured full professor of marketing at the University of Southern California, where he ranked as one of the top five marketing scholars based on number of publications and citations.

He has also served on the faculty at the University of Arizona and as a visiting professor at Harvard Business School, as well as on the review boards of the Journal of Marketing and the Journal of Marketing Research. He is the co-author four textbooks on e-commerce and has taught topics including leadership, corporate strategy, and service management.

View the article at KPCC, SCPR.org

Wednesday, October 17/2012

Woman at the Top: Challenges, Opportunities, Success!

Patricia Hausknost in conversation with Professor Jenny Darroch

It's 1950 and you're a woman running a household. What’s your typical day? You get up early, make lunch for your husband and kids, rush him off to work and the little ones to school, run the vacuum, do some laundry, pick the kids up from school and shuttle them to baseball or ballet, make dinner, put the kids to bed - and then do it all again tomorrow. Flash forward to 2012 - women are very much a part of the working world, with jobs ranging from architects to receptionists to news anchors to CEO's.

The woman at the top – who is she and how does she operate at a high level of management? In this installment of the Drucker Business Forum series, we talk with two women at the height of their fields in business and education about the challenges and opportunities they see for females in the workforce. Join Patricia Hausknost, senior vice president at City National Bank and chair of the United Way Women Leaders Cabinet, and Jenny Darroch, associate professor of marketing and MBA Academic Director at the Drucker School of Management, as they exchange ideas and experiences gained through working their way up in the organizational and corporate worlds.

Patricia Hausknost is Senior Vice President and Manager, Financial Institutions, City National Bank, and the Chair of the United Way Women Leadership Cabinet.

 

Patricia is a highly-respected member of the business community with more than 38 years of experience in the banking industry. Holding an MBA from Chicago’s Loyola University, she moved to Southern California in 1998 and is currently a Senior Vice President at the Los Angeles-based City National Bank.

In addition to becoming a Certified Financial Planner and teaching courses at UCLA Extension in her spare time, Patricia has made invaluable contributions to UWGLA’s Women Leaders – an influential network of local businesswomen who are committed to breaking the cycle of poverty in L.A. County.

This past May, Patricia participated in United Way’s first annual Career Day at El Sereno Middle School and was the opening speaker at the Women Leaders 2012 Spring Breakfast which featured special guest, LAUSD Board President Monica Garcia.

 

Jenny Darroch is an Associate Professor of Marketing and MBA Academic Director for the Drucker School of Management; her first book, Marketing Through Turbulent Times, was published in 2009.

 

Jack Harding
Jenny Darroch is the Associate Professor of Marketing & MBA Academic Director. Prior to joining the Drucker School faculty, she was the Director of Entrepreneurship and a Senior Lecturer [Associate Professor] in Marketing at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

She has taught in numerous executive education programs in New Zealand and around the Asia-Pacific region, managed the marketing curriculum for a large MBA program in New Zealand, developed and launched a Masters degree in Entrepreneurship, and was instrumental in developing support structures to allow the commercialization of science and technology intellectual property from universities. In 2002, Jenny had the honor of leading the New Zealand delegation to an APEC conference in Monterrey, Mexico, aimed at developing policies to support young entrepreneurs.

View the article at KPCC, SCPR.org






Thursday, September 13/2012

Starting that Brand New Business: incubate and innovate your way to success

Allen Morgan in conversation with Matt DeBord

Allen Morgan is managing director of the New Ventures Group at Idealab, where the mission is to create and operate pioneering companies.

David Audretsch
Is a new venture in your future? The hardest thing about starting a business is...well, getting started. Risks are considerable, rewards uncertain. But when you incubate a new enterprise, you join a special group. You become an entrepreneur.

Innovation fuels the business pioneer, but successful innovation and entrepreneurship demand insight and ideas. For the inside story on the world of innovation, entrepreneurship, risk, and reward we turn to one of the Southern California institutions where ideas are the lifeblood of innovation—Idealab, an incubator of high-tech startups.

This program is a Drucker Business Forum co-presented by SCPR and the Drucker School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.

 

Matt DeBord is a KPCC business and economy reporter and author of The DeBord Report.

Jack Harding
Matthew DeBord has written about economics, business, and financial issues for publications including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, CBS.com, and the Huffington Post. In 2010, he began the DeBord Report for KPCC.org.

Matt has appeared frequently on KPCC to discuss business and the economy. He has also commented for NPR, KCRW’s “To the Point” with Warren Olney, “America Now with Andy Dean,” MSNBC, RT, Radio France, China Radio International, and the Tokyo Broadcasting System. He has moderated panels and conducted conversations at the Crawford Family Forum, as well as at the Drucker School and Art Center College of Design.

In recent years, he has covered the global automobile industry. He has also worked in marketing, advertising, and communications, developing blogging and social-media strategies and platforms.

A graduate of Clemson and New York universities, Matt has written about environmental finance and presented at national conferences on the carbon economy and sustainability. He spent three years on staff at Wine Spectator magazine and is the author of The New York Book of Wine and Wine Country USA.

DeBord is also known to enjoy playing (and writing about) golf, tennis, and squash. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Maria Russo, and their three young children.

View the article at KPCC, SCPR.org






Monday, July 23/2012

Care to Dare: a challenge to high performance leaders

George Kohlrieser in conversation with Matt DeBord

George Kohlrieser is a professor of leadership and organizational behavior at IMD, a Switzerland–based international business school; a former hostage negotiator; and author of Hostage at the Table: How Leaders Can Overcome Conflict, Influence Others and Raise Performance. His new book is Care to Dare: Unleashing Astonishing Potential through Secure Base Leadership.

 

David Audretsch
Bond with people, be accessible, develop talent, drive change, encourage risk… these are just a few marks of high performance leadership as outlined by George Kohlrieser, former hostage negotiator, author, and professor of leadership and organizational behavior at IMD, a Switzerland–based international business school.

But research shows that a major difference between success and failure is the presence of a leader’s own secure base and his or her willingness to dare others to succeed. Join Kohlrieser and KPCC’s Matt DeBord as they talk about ways to release fear in those around you, unleash potential through the building of trust and deliver change through focus – all leading to sustainable high performance.

This program is a Drucker Business Forum co-presented by SCPR and the Drucker School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.

 

Matt DeBord is a KPCC business and economy reporter and author of The DeBord Report.

 

Jack Harding
Matthew DeBord has written about economics, business, and financial issues for publications including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, CBS.com, and the Huffington Post. In 2010, he began the DeBord Report for KPCC.org.

Matt has appeared frequently on KPCC to discuss business and the economy. He has also commented for NPR, KCRW’s “To the Point” with Warren Olney, “America Now with Andy Dean,” MSNBC, RT, Radio France, China Radio International, and the Tokyo Broadcasting System. He has moderated panels and conducted conversations at the Crawford Family Forum, as well as at the Drucker School and Art Center College of Design.

In recent years, he has covered the global automobile industry. He has also worked in marketing, advertising, and communications, developing blogging and social-media strategies and platforms.

A graduate of Clemson and New York universities, Matt has written about environmental finance and presented at national conferences on the carbon economy and sustainability. He spent three years on staff at Wine Spectator magazine and is the author of The New York Book of Wine and Wine Country USA.

DeBord is also known to enjoy playing (and writing about) golf, tennis, and squash. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Maria Russo, and their three young children.

View the article at KPCC, SCPR.org






Thursday, June 07/2012

The Moral Molecule

Paul Zak in conversation with Zach First

Paul J. Zak is a scientist, prolific author, entrepreneur, TV personality, and public speaker. He is the founding director of the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies and professor of economics, psychology and management at Claremont Graduate University.

 

David Audretsch
Paul Zak also serves as professor of neurology at Loma Linda University Medical Center and is a senior researcher at UCLA.

He has degrees in mathematics and economics from San Diego State University, a PhD in economics from University of Pennsylvania, and post-doctoral training in neuroimaging from Harvard University. He is credited with the first published use of the term "neuroeconomics" and has been a vanguard in this new discipline. He organized and administers the first doctoral program in neuroeconomics in the world at Claremont Graduate University.

Zak is a recognized expert in oxytocin. His lab discovered in 2004 that oxytocin allows us to determine who to trust. His current research is showing that oxytocin is responsible for virtuous behaviors, working as the brain's "moral molecule." This knowledge is being used to understand the basis for civilization and modern economies, improve negotiations, and treat patients with neurologic and psychiatric disorders.

 

Zachary First is managing director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University

 

Jack Harding
First joined the Drucker Institute in 2007 as its second full-time employee. He now leads the design and delivery of the institute’s executive forums and advising practice, oversees its licensing and business development, and shares responsibility with the executive director for its strategy and finances.

He came to the Drucker Institute after a 10-year career in higher education research and administration. He served as the inaugural assistant dean at Olin College, which was founded in 2000 with a $430 million gift from the F. W. Olin Foundation, in order to reinvent engineering education.

First received his BA in philosophy from Haverford College, and his masters and doctorate degrees in higher education from Harvard University. His doctoral dissertation research focused on the connection between presidential tactics and college and university performance. He is a fellow of the National Forum on the Future of Liberal Education and a trustee of the Children’s Center at Caltech, a nonprofit that provides early childhood and preschool education to the Caltech and Pasadena communities.






Thursday, April 12/2012

Creating the Entrepreneurial Society

David B. Audretsch  In conversation with Jack Harding

David B. Audretsch is a distinguished professor, Ameritech Chair of Economic Development and Director, at the Institute for Development Strategies at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University at Bloomington

 

David Audretsch
David Audretsch is an honorary professor of industrial economics and entrepreneurship at the WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany. In addition, he serves as a visiting professor at the King Saud University in Saudi Arabia and as a research professor at Durham University, an external director of research at the Kiel Institute for the World Economics, honorary professor at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany, and is a research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London.

Audretsch's research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development, and global competitiveness. His research has been published in over 100 scholarly articles in the leading academic journals. He is co-founder and co-editor of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal.

 

Jack Harding, is President, and CEO of e-Silicon Corporation in Sunnyvale, California

 

Jack Harding
Prior to co-founding eSilicon in 2000, Jack Harding served as president and CEO of Cooper & Chyan Technology, as well as Cadence Design Systems, which, under his leadership, became the world's largest supplier of electronics design software. In the public-policy arena, Harding has served as a member of the Steering Committee at the US Council on Competiveness, and he was a former National Academies' Committee member for Software, Growth and the Future of the US Economy. In 2010, Harding was elected as the new value chain producer director to the board of directors of the Global Semiconductor Alliance (GSA) and was re-elected to the GSA board seat in 2012. He is a frequent international speaker on the topics of innovation, entrepreneurship, and semiconductor trends and policies.






Thursday, March 15/2012

Key Challenges Ahead and the Leaders We Need Today

Punit Renjen  In conversation with Bernie Jaworski

Punit Renjen is chairman of the board of Deloitte LLP.

 

Punit Renjen
Punit Renjen has held a number of leadership roles, including most recently as chairman and CEO of Deloitte Consulting LLP. He has led Strategy & Operations (S&O) and Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Consultative Services for Deloitte Consulting in the United States, as well as for the global network, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL). In addition to chairing the Deloitte LLP Board of Directors, Renjen serves on the global DTTL Board of Director and on the Global Deloitte Consulting Executive Committee.

As chairman and CEO of Deloitte Consulting LLP, Renjen drove tremendous growth in the US consulting practice despite the recession, helping DTTL become the largest global consulting provider according to leading analysts’ rankings. He guided Deloitte Consulting LLP to be recognized as one of “2010 Best Firms to Work For” by Consulting magazine and as one of the top firms in Vault’s Guide to the Top 50 Management and Strategy Consulting Firms. Under Renjen’s leadership, the US consulting organization focused on setting the standard for operational excellence, transparency, accountability, and uncompromised quality.


Bernie Jaworski, is the Peter F. Drucker Chair of Management and Liberal Arts at the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management

 

Bernie Jaworski
Prior to his appointment at the Drucker School, Bernie Jaworski was the executive vice president, IMD, North America. Jaworski was also a senior partner and president of Monitor Executive Development.






Thursday, February 23/2012

What Would Drucker Do Now?

Rick Wartzman  In conversation with Russ Stanton

Rick Wartzman is the executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University.

 

Wartzman
Wartzman is the executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University. The institute's mission is to better society by stimulating effective management and responsible leadership. It does this, in large part, by advancing the teachings of the late Peter F. Drucker, "the man who invented management" (in the words of BusinessWeek magazine).

In addition to his duties at the Drucker Institute, Wartzman writes “The Drucker Difference” column for Bloomberg Businessweek online. A collection of his columns, What Would Drucker Do Now?, was published by McGraw-Hill in 2011. He’s also the editor of The Drucker Lectures: Essential Lessons on Management, Society, and Economy, published by McGraw-Hill in 2010.

Before joining the institute, Wartzman worked for two decades in newspapers. He began his career at the Wall Street Journal, where he served in a variety of positions, including White House correspondent and founding editor of the paper’s weekly California section. He joined the Los Angeles Times in 2002 as business editor and, in that role, helped shape “The Wal-Mart Effect,” which won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. Wartzman later became editor of the newspaper’s Sunday magazine, West.

Wartzman’s book, Obscene in the Extreme: The Burning and Banning of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, was published by PublicAffairs in 2008. It was one of the Los Angeles Times‘ 25 favorite nonfiction books of the year, as well as a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in history and a PEN USA Literary Award. Wartzman is the co-author, with Mark Arax, of the best-seller The King of California: J.G. Boswell and the Making of a Secret American Empire, which was selected as one of the 10 best books of 2003 by the San Francisco Chronicle and one of the 10 best nonfiction books of the year by the Los Angeles Times. It also won, among other honors, a California Book Award and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing.


Russ Stanton, is the vice president of content for Southern California Public Radio

 

Stanton
Stanton oversees its award-winning newsroom, which produces programming for 89.3 KPCC-FM in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, 891. KUOR-FM in the Inland Empire, 90.3 KVLA-FM in the Coachella Vallley, and for www.KPCC.org.

Before joining SCPR this year, Stanton was the editor of the Los Angeles Times from 2008 to 2011, capping a 30-year career in newspapers. At the Times, he led a rapid expansion of its online news reporting and the restructuring and integration of its Internet operation with the print newsroom.

During his tenure as editor, the Times won three Pulitzer Prizes, including the Gold Medal for Public Service for coverage of the financial scandal in the city of Bell, and was a finalist six other times.


Thursday, February 09/2012

Ravi Sawhney, President & CEO, author, lecturer, thought leader
In conversation with Dr. Arvind Bhambri, associate professor of management and organization

Ravi Sawhney, FIDSA: Leader of the  RKS Design team, founder and CEO, who is also an author, lecturer and thought leader on design and innovation.

 

Griffis
Sawhney is a popular keynote speaker who has been featured recently in DC at the U.S. Patent & Trademark headquarters alongside the Undersecretary of Commerce, in Brazil at the Cycle of Knowledge Conference, in Cannes at the World Innovation Conference, and at the IDSA National Convention’s awards program.

Mr. Sawhney is sought in both corporate and academic environments for his deep knowledge of design strategy, innovation collaboration and empathetic and psychological knowledge of people and consumer behavior.

Mr. Sawhney has had an impressive and varied career that gets more exciting every day! He helped invent the touch screen, reinvented the electric guitar, developed children’s favorite Teddy Ruxpin, and has helped deliver clever product solutions and concepts more recently for clients in many categories from healthcare, to kitchen tools, consumer electronics and everything in-between.

Sawhney writes for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Core77 and others as an expert blogger, has been inducted as a Fellow in the Industrial Design Society of America (IDSA) and recognized with an honorary Ph.D. from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. He is also the innovator/Jury Chair emeritus of IDSA’s Catalyst case program, championing design’s power to effect positive change in business, in lives and throughout the world, and a fixture as juror or chairman at many of the world’s most prestigious product design competitions.



Dr. Arvind Bhambri, is an associate professor of management and organization at the USC Marshall School of Business

 

Ranadive
Arvind Bhambri specializes in strategic change, competitive strategy, global business development, and leadership. He has twice received the Golden Apple Award for MBA instruction. In a 2008 special report on executive MBA programs by The Wall Street Journal, Professor Bhambri was profiled as one of fourteen best EMBA professors worldwide. In 2009, he received the Evan C. Thompson Award for Learning and Teaching Innovation. Professor Bhambri has served on on the faculty of the Getty Museum Leadership Institute, Bocconi University, University of Hawaii?s Advanced Management Program, and the Owner Managed Business Institute in Boston.


 

Thursday, January 26/2012

Bruce Rosenstein, editor and author
In conversation with Shannon Barnes, nonprofit consultant

Bruce Rosenstein is managing editor for the journal Leader to Leader; Author of Living in More Than One World: How Peter Drucker's Wisdom Can Inspire and Transform Your Life

 

Griffis
Living in More Than One World: How Peter Drucker's Wisdom Can Inspire and Transform Your Life was published by Berrett-Koehler in 2009. It has since been published in Brazil, China, and Japan. For 21 years, Rosenstein was a librarian for USA TODAY, where he also wrote about business and management books for the "Money" section of the newspaper. He serves as an adjunct faculty member for the Catholic University of America School of Library and Information Science.

He has presented at the Drucker School, the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, and the National Press Club, in Washington, DC. Besides USA TODAY, he has written for such publications as Leader to Leader, Leadership Excellence, American Executive and Information Outlook. He conducted one of the last interviews with Peter Drucker, seven months before Drucker’s death, in 2005. His website is www.brucerosenstein.com.



Shannon Barnes, Senior Advisor for the Edge Group, a leadership consultancy helping nonprofit organizations grow and achieve their mission.

 

Ranadive
Shannon Barnes has spent more than a decade as a pastor, strategist, and communications director for two growing churches. He has extensive experience in strategy, leadership, board development, conflict resolution, branding, and communications, and the ability to organize complex relationships into highly productive and mission-oriented teams.


 

Thursday, December 8/2011

Alisa Griffis, professor and author
In conversation with Margaret Grogan, professor of educational leadership and policy

Alisa Griffis, professor of education speaks on her book,
The Power of Three: Managing Life's Challenges

 

Griffis
Alisa Griffis is a professor of education at Indiana Wesleyan University, where she is the head of Educational Research in the Master's in Education Program. She teaches all classes in the M.Ed. program as well as undergraduate English. Dr. Griffis has a B.A. degree in Interpersonal and Organizational Communication, an M.S. in Education, and a Ph.D. in Education, with a specialization in brain research in learning and methods of learning acquisition.

Dr. Griffis wrote The Power of Three: Managing Life in a Hectic World after observing so many energetic professionals begin to wear down after years of being overly busy. In today's world, busy adults are compelled to accomplish many feats all at once. Parents and professionals alike juggle tasks and feel pressured to do and achieve even more. This leads to "the crazies" we have all experienced exhaustion, panic, weight gain, stress, broken health, and/or lack of peace.



Margaret Grogan, professor of educational leadership and policy and dean of the School of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University

 

Ranadive
Margaret Grogan, a frequent keynote speaker, has published many articles and chapters, and has authored, co-authored, or edited five books. Her latest, co-authored with Charol Shakeshaft, is titled Women in Educational Leadership (2011). Her current research focuses on women in leadership, the moral and ethical dimensions of leadership, and leadership for social justice.

 

 

The Drucker Business Forum is produced by The Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.The series is co-presented by KPCC.

 

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