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DPE Tuesday Talk Series: Char Miller, “Streetscape Environmentalism: Flood Control, Social Justice, and Political Power in San Antonio”

The Division of Politics and Economics invites the CGU community to attend this week’s Tuesday Lunch Talk featuring Char Miller, PhD, W. M. Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis and History at Pomona College. Lunch will be provided.

Char Miller, PhD, is the W. M. Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis and History at Pomona College. His most recent books include The Nature of Hope: Grassroots Organizing, Environmental Justice, and Political Change (2019), Ogallala: Water for a Dry Land (2018), San Antonio: A Tricentennial History (2018), and Where There’s Smoke: The Environmental Science, Public Policy, and Politics of Marijuana. Other books include Not So Golden State: Sustainability vs. the California Dream (2016), America’s Great National Forests, Wildernesses, and Grasslands (2016), and On the Edge: Water, Immigration, and Politics in the Southwest (2013). His current project is entitled Rampaging Waters: The 1921 Flood and Modern San Antonio, from which this talk is drawn.

Char Miller, PhD

Talk Title: Streetscape Environmentalism: Flood Control, Social Justice, and Political Power in San Antonio

Description:
San Antonio, Texas is located in what the National Weather Service dubs “Flash-Flood Alley,” and its environmental history can be timed around a series of great floods that have ripped through the community. The first recorded inundation was in 1819, when the Spanish colonial outpost was almost wipe out. A century later a rampaging flood took apart the now-American city, with devastating results. Drawing on a wealth of material culture and historical resources, Miller probes what these and other floods reveal about the Alamo City’s contested and conflicted past, about the environmental injustices embedded in its flood-control policies, and the remarkable political revolt that the most discriminated neighborhoods launched in the mid-1970s to gain control over the city’s budget and thus the once-skewed distribution of public assets.