Portrait of Bin Xie
  • Email
    bin.xie@cgu.edu
  • Degrees
    PhD, University of Southern California
    MS, University of Southern California
    MS, University of Utah
  • Research Interests
    Obesity prevention; Tobacco control; Diet, physical activity, body image in adolescents; Psychological adjustment to obesity; Diabetes and cancer; Application of statistical analysis in prevention research

Bin Xie is an associate professor in the School of Community & Global Health at Claremont Graduate University. He has an interdisciplinary training and research background in epidemiology, biostatistics, nutritional sciences and behavioral sciences with research interests primarily focused on obesity prevention and application of the advanced statistical approaches in epidemiological and prevention research. His research also focuses on the disparities in health and risk behaviors, physical and mental well-being, and health care access and utilization in American minority populations.

Xie received his MS and PhD from the University of Southern California. He has extensive background in statistics and research methodology and has begun developing expertise in design of randomized control trials and application of advanced statistics (such as path model, structural equation model, growth cure and mixture models, random-effect mixed model, and generalized estimating equations).

He has served as PI on several NIH-funded projects with research focuses on the developmental trajectories of overweight and related behaviors, the mediation-moderation framework in obesity, family characteristics and psychosocial behaviors in adolescents, and influences of genetic variants, stressful life events, family functioning, and parenting characteristics in obesity, food consumption and physical activity among children and adolescents.

Xie has served as a faculty biostatistician, providing statistical and methodological support on over 15 projects funded by NIH, and numerous state- and university-funded studies, and has taught courses in both introductory and advanced levels of statistics.

Co-authored with Paula Palmer, et al. “Gender Difference in Interactions between MAOA Promoter uVNTR Polymorphism and Negative Familial Stressors on Body Mass Index among Chinese Adolescents.” Pediatric Obesity 9, no. 5 (2013): e80–90.

Co-authored with K. Ishibashi K, et al. “Overweight trajectories and psychosocial adjustment during pubertal transition.” Preventive Medicine 57, no. 6 (2013): 837–43.

Co-authored with C. Anderson Johnson, et al. “Developmental Trajectories of Cigarette Use and Associations with Multi-layered Risk Factors in Chinese Early Adolescents.” Nicotine & Tobacco Research 15, no. 10 (2013): 1673–81.

Co-authored with Paula Palmer, et al. “Relative income inequality and selected health outcomes in urban Chinese youth.” Social Science & Medicine 74, no. 1 (2012): 84–91.

Co-authored with Ping Sun, et al. “One Year Post Collaborative Depression Care Trial Outcomes among Predominantly Hispanic Diabetes Safety Net Patients.” General Hospital Psychiatry 33 (2011): 436–42.

Co-authored with Kim Reynolds, et al. “Longitudinal Analysis of Weight Perception and Psychological Factors in Chinese Adolescents.” American Journal of Health Behavior 35 (2011): 92–104.

Advanced Statistical Methods
Principles of Biostatistics
Data Analysis Using SAS
Emerging Infectious & Chronic Diseases